Image ©Yusuke Kawasaki

Getting Around Bratislava: the Definitive Guide to its Transport Hubs

Here’s how to find how Bratislava’s main transport links… because we know you’ll want to…

1 – Air:

Bratislava’s M. R. Štefánik Airport lies to the east of Ružinov 8km outside the city centre. All flights to Bratislava come here (click here for a post on Slovakia’s air connections). It’s a modern place, although don’t get here too long before your flight departure time, as there’s nothing to do once you’ve gone through security and queues almost never take longer than fifteen minutes to pass through. Awaiting on the other side of security? A shop and three cafes (Arrivals boasts a further two cafes). In Arrivals are also the gaggle of rent-a-car offices, an ATM and money-changing facilities. Departures is a hardly-leg-busting 2 minute walk from Arrivals, in the same building, and there’s another cafe here. The most likely way you’ll be spending time here if you’ve just arrived is waiting for the ridiculous plane-to-customs bus, where you wait about 20 minutes for it to leave for the 400m-odd journey…

There is also the larger international airport in Vienna, Austria – just one hour’s drive away.

Here’s the official LINK to the very good in-English info at the Bratislava Airport website, which includes a map of where the airport is and all kinds of FAQs related to the airport.

RELATED POST: Getting from the airport to the bus station, train station (Hlavná Stanica), central Vienna and Vienna airport

RELATED POST: Where to stay close to the airport

RELATED POST: How to get from the airport (or the train station) to Bratislava’s main hotels

2 – Train:

The main (and pitifully ugly) train station is Hlavná Stanica, just north of the Old Town (Predstaničné Námestie, which runs back from Šancová). It’s full of tatty baguette and kebab booths, as well as one endearing train station cafe. The much-talked of refurbishment is still a long way from becoming a reality. Prize for Europe’s most lamentable capital city main train station and a deceptively poor advert for a lovely city, but good connections nationwide…

You should not need to go anywhere else to get a train within Slovakia as the overwhelming majority of national and international trains depart from here.

Here’s the LINK to good in-English info including a list of station facilities, a map of where the station is and all kinds of FAQs relating to the station, including public transport connections from the train station to the rest of Bratislava.

RELATED POST: Getting from Hlavná Stanica to the bus station & airport.

3 – Bus:

Most buses to other parts of Slovakia and international destinations leave from the Mlynské Nivy bus station (on Mlynské Nivy). It’s far from being up with the usual standards of modern capital city bus stations but it’s a damned sight nicer than the train station.

Here’s the LINK to the best in-English info, with a map and info on public transport connections from the bus station to the rest of Bratislava.

RELATED POST: Getting from the bus station to Hlavná Stanica (the train station) & to the airport

4 – Boat:

The main port from which all boat trips, both national and international, arrive/depart is just down from the Old Town on the Danube (Fajnorovo Nabrezie 2).

Here’s a LINK to the best in-English info, including a map and a list of the port facilities. The port is within easy walking distance of the Old Town centre.

RELATED POST: Getting to Bratislava by Boat

5 – Public Transport Around Bratislava:

The most updated source of information on Bratislava public transport, and the first port of call for in -English info on planning your route on public transport around Bratislava is imhd.zoznam.sk which also includes this very useful page on where to purchase Bratislava public transport tickets (for single or multiple journeys or long-term passes). But it can be confusing, nevertheless, to work out how and where you want to go in Bratislava city and for this reason we have created this handy post on Bratislava’s main tram, bus and trolleybus routes.

RELATED POST: Map of Greater Bratislava (to see the city in perspective)

6 – Public Transport Across Slovakia:

The most updated source of information on public transport across Slovakia, and the first port of call for in-English info on planning your route on public transport across Slovakia, is Cp.atlas.sk.

Boat: Getting to Bratislava by River

Everyone knows about those grand old Central European trains, right? Kicking back in the dining car with a frothy beer and a plate of fried cheese (well fried cheese is unquestionably the dish all Central European trains do best) as you cruise between nations is undeniably one of the continent’s very best experiences. And of course, being a through-stop between west and east, Bratislava’s Hlavná Stanica train station is one of the great the jump-on points for such a journey. For Bratislava train connection info, let’s give the floor to the Man in Seat 61. But Bratislava is blessed with an arguably still grander possibility of approach (or indeed departure): on, oh yes, the Blue Danube itself – from Vienna (or, if you just want to glimpse Bratislava from the water but not stop, Budapest).

OK, the Danube (Dunaj) is not always as blue as Strauss insinuates in his music:) Nevertheless, large swathes of the journey between Vienna and Bratislava are very pretty (through Nationalpark Donau Auen) and the water really does seem cobalt at points when contrasted with the green of the forests on either side. The prettiest part of the journey is around the town of Hainburg near the Austrian border and, just beyond, by the confluence of the Morava at Devín Castle.

Vienna to Bratislava Boats (and back)

1: Lod.sk Vienna-Bratislava Hydrofoil: Hydrofoil boats leave from late April to late October. They run Wednesday to Sunday from late April to late June, daily in July/August and Friday to Sunday from September until the end of the season in late October. Departure from Vienna is 17:30, departure from Bratislava is 9:00 (the boats, Slovak-run, give you the day in Vienna or the night in Bratislava). Journey duration is 90 minutes downriver to Bratislava and 105 minutes upriver to Vienna. Prices are 20/29 Euros single/return. Of course with your ticket you don’t have to travel back next morning; it’s valid for when you want to travel back. The Lod.sk website is now in Slovak (of course), German and English.

2: Twin City Liner Boats: The Austrian-run Twin City Liner runs regular (almost) year-round connections from Vienna to Bratislava. Departure from Vienna is at 8:3012:30 and 16:30 with departure from Bratislava at 10:3014:30 and 18:30. From March to October there are usually one or two additional services as well each way. Boats are a bit quicker than the Lod.sk Hydrofoil boats as a rule (75 minutes downriver to Bratislava, 90 minutes upriver back again). Prices however seem a tad steep, at an average 30 Euros for a single trip – meaning that overall Englishmaninslovakia recommends Lod.sk when possible during the tourist season. The Twin City Liner website is in German, but has a basic English version.

Departure in Vienna: Schiffstation Reichsbrücke, Handelskai 265. All Bratislava boats depart from here, unless you’re on a cruise ship, in which case you’ll likely be told everything and won’t require this blog to help. Nearest subway: Vorgartenstraße (on U1 line).

Departure in Bratislava: International port, Fajnorovo nábrežie 2, just down on the river from the Old Town east of Most SNP. Here’s a list of facilities available in the terminal building.

Between the beginning of June and the end of August, a Budapest to Vienna Hydrofoil passes through Bratislava but ridiculously does not stop off (it used to; they scrapped it). Departure times are 9:00 from Budapest (Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday) and 9:00 from Vienna (Wednesday, Friday, Sunday). You’ll pass through Bratislava at approximately 13:45/10:30 respectively depending on which way you’re going. Total journey time is between 5.5 and 6.5 hours.

GETTING TO BRATISLAVA BUT NOT BY BOAT: See our list of air connections to Slovakia.

NEXT ON THE JOURNEY: On the way from Bratislava to Vienna by boat, the most diverting spot, just over the Austrian border, is Hainburg, 16km west.

The Train Station Cafe – Vestiges of Old Glamour

Wifi: Non-existent  (regrettably, given the name of the joint)

On a visit to Budapest recently I was reminded again of just how many glamorous cafes of old there are in the city – Ruszvurm near the castle, for instance, that Austrian Empress Elizabeth used to send for cakes from, or New York Cafe, that all the famous turn-of-the-century Hungarian writers like Ferenc Molnár once hung out in.

Bratislava cannot really boast such a pedigree of coffee houses – not ones with this kind of colourful history. On Hlavné Námestie there is Kaffee Mayer (which, it is true, used to count among its patrons the colourful city character Schöner Náci – statue outside the doors). There is the nearby Caffe Roland. And these cafes do admittedly lend a touch of that bygone elegance – but the ambience is someone detracted from by the numbers of tourists and the service as frosty as a layer of wedding cake icing.

But there is a touch of that bygone cafe glamour of old – just a touch – in the unlikeliest of Bratislava locales. Yes, the otherwise shabby Hlavná Stanica, Bratislava’s main railway station. The station forecourt might be a mass of decrepit snack stands but, up the steps by the departures/arrivals screen and next to the Slovenská Sporitel’ňa bank ATM, there is the inconspicuous, unassuming and somewhat puzzlingly named Caffe Internet.

Its name, one imagines, was not always thus – and, as the ailing computer terminal has now been removed – should perhaps no longer be. But there are the worn leather-upholstered booths, the ancient dark wood furniture, the stately old mirrors, the swinging chandeliers and the ceiling with the motif of an eagle alighting on a globe – trappings from another very different age. The service, a stoic old lady who gets confused if you order much above coffee or a beer, is not reminiscent of the glory days. But something in the ambience certainly is.  The ghosts of train travellers of yore, you feel, flit around the walls of this place. A shadowy bowler-hatted character from a Graham Greene novel could be behind the unfurled newspaper someone – who knows who? – at the next booth is holding aloft.

And the thing about Caffe Internet is that you are obliged to pass by its creaking old doors when you get your train out of (or into) Bratislava. It’s my most-visited coffee shop in the entire city for that reason. So take the extra twenty minutes out to stop in for a cup of the fairly decent espresso and imagine yourself transported decades back to train travel at the height of its sophistication – when young men of means took their “Grand Tours” to Austro-Hungary and when waiters in restaurant cars wore suits. It’s a step up from the disconsolate Pumpkin cafe chain that peppers many railway stations in the UK, at least…

MAP LINK:

LOCATION: Hlavná Stanica railway station.

OPENING: About 6am-9pm daily

BEST TIME TO VISIT: Any time you need to take a train…

NEXT ON THE JOURNEY: From Bratislava’s Hlavná Stanica station, it’s a 2km walk north to Kamzík, at which point you are all set to embark on a pilgrimage to Marianka

Trains: Regiojet – Too Good to be True?

Until recently, ZSSK, the state-owned Slovak train company, ran all train routes in Slovakia. This was not a wholly bad thing, because as monopolies go, this was a pretty fair one, with reasonable prices for train travel nationwide, and several notable efforts of recent years to step up quality (the introduction of smart new two-tier trains to run many routes, the introduction of wifi on the IC train routes between Bratislava and Košice). BUT.

But competition is always healthy, and competition has finally been provided by the expansion of Czech-owned Regiojet into Slovakia. Actually, RegioJet have been operating on Slovak turf since 2011 (when they began running the Bratislava to Komarno route). But it was their additional routes added in 2014 which captured people’s attention, because that was when they began operating some trains on the main railway route in Slovakia – from Bratislava through Poprad to Košice.

We recently caught up with one of Slovakia’s leading tour operators, Erik Ševčík of Adventoura, who lives in Poprad in the High Tatras and welcomes the new service.

“I have done the journey between Bratislava and Poprad Tatry several times now” says Erik. “It takes three and a half hours, which is the same as the IC Trains. Why do we welcome the RegioJet service? Well, the first big thing is the ticket price: as little as 9 Euros one-way for a 350km journey. This is for the most basic category, standard class (in 6-person compartments usually), but this is still very comfortable – and there is also relax class and business class for those who want something more. Second, even in standard class, you get mineral water or coffee for free, plus a complementary newspaper. Third, everyone likes free Wifi and RegioJet has that too. It’s just a pleasure to travel with them, and the state-run trains for the same journey cost around 13 Euros and don’t have these kind of services.”

The seats also deserve a mention: leather, reclining and with comfy arm rests, as well as small tables and plenty of leg room. They actually beat those on a great deal of airlines. Relax Class and Business Class get even more comfort (mainly the space per person, the comfort of the seats and the table space improve).

“In Slovakia we think they are doing a great job” says Erik “not just for Slovaks, but also for travellers.”

Your next trip east in Slovakia, it seems, could certainly be in more style… and for a cheaper price.