Great antiques - image by www.englishmaninslovakia.co.uk

Bratislava: The Best of the City’s Antiques (Souvenirs)

One can rush through Bratislava – see only its ugly outskirts – and come away thinking there is nothing there. Even should one find one’s way to the maze of cobbled Old Town alleys, one can come away not glimpsing a fraction of the quirks they contain. I’ve said so on this site before – and lamented it publicly to others on multiple occasions: the city’s charms are not the most obvious. As with any true quest, you have to hunt them down…

Such is the case even with those charms that are, so to speak, smack bang under your nose: Bratislava’s best antique shop, for example…

Cafe l’Aura and its attached antiques shop marry inside one lemon-and-cream facade a great deal of the things central Bratislava does best: a wonderful (and reasonably priced) little cafe, a fabulous antique shop and bundles of epoch-old atmosphere.

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©www.englishmaninslovakia.co.uk

The first striking thing about it is its location: right by imposing St Martin’s Cathedral; indeed abutting one end of the cathedral buildings. The second striking thing is that, once you dip inside the low doorway and get accustomed to the gloom, you find a shop-cum-cafe not only oozing with understated unpretentious appeal but also one that is often utterly devoid of customers.

The equivalent in another city could not be conceived of. A shop near St Pauls Cathedral or Notre Dame or Vienna’s Ringstrasse like this would be rammed to the gills with milling tourists – and most probably rammed to the gills with insipid tack, too.

Whilst the enterprise masquerades under the name of Cafe l’Aura (advertising itself only by a humble engraved wooden sign) I think of it primarily as an old curiosity shop and second as a cafe.

Normally, I scan the heavily-laden shelves for some of the reasonably priced wares, and only afterwards retreat to turn them lovingly over in my hands over a coffee or two.

And what wares! Ancient coffee grinders, some stunning oil paintings, piles of old travellers’ trunks,  ceramics and clocks from the city’s 18th- and 19th-century heyday.

Any antique shop must necessarily be a reflection of the past of the city in which it sits, but the past that comes alive in a shop like Bratislava is a particularly fascinating one: because it is the German and Hungarian influences on the city that become evident when you peruse the curios here. Because half a century ago or more, Slovakia existed only as an idea…

Which brings up another thing. One which, admittedly, it is far easier for an outsider to see than someone born here. Slovakia has come a long way. In under a quarter of a century, it has become a place with its own identity (bashful at times admittedly) which can casually display its often subjugated history on some sagging old shelves and – in so doing – make it a reason to visit Slovakia today. Because antique shops are becoming a real reason to visit – not just in Bratislava, either.

There is little of the “Portobello Road” syndrome just yet (though perhaps it will come): i.e. inflated prices for what is ultimately not very much. Even Bratislava is, in this respect, very much a bargain-hunters playground where antiques are concerned.

And in the case of humble yet ambience-rich little Cafe l’Aura, it would be one of my first choices in the city centre to look for that authentic souvenir for the folks back home…

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LOCATION: Rudnayovo Námestie 4

OPENING: 10am-6pm

The lovely rustic-style Pizzeria Hacienda ©Alan Gilman

Lučenec: The Best Places to Eat

By Alan Gilman.

‘Where ?’, you might say. And you would be in a majority if you hadn’t so much as heard of Lučenec. Ok, it’s not on the list of standard tourist stop-offs but times change, and as they do reasons to pause in a destination you never knew before change as well.

Just to place it, the town is on the main road from Zvolen to Kosiče and is the crossroad town for the route south into Hungary via the border town of Salgotarjan. Over the years the link with Hungary has been strong with lots of the older generation, my wifes’ family included, still switching easily between the languages of Slovak and Hungarian. These roots manifest in the food as well, with spicy and sweet paprika appearing regularly.

The last few years has seen some really positive developments in the town, with none more notable than the major renovation, completed earlier in 2016, of the town’s synagogue as a new cultural centre. The synagogue was one of the largest in Central Europe but had been derelict since WW2. Since it reopened in May this year, the national opera orchestra (based in Banská Bystrica) and the popular folk-based group Szidi Tobias have already performed there. Quite a radical change for Lucenec !

Go to the Synagoga Lucenec Facebook page (the tours and sightseeing version) for more information, great photos and a time lapse video of the reconstruction.

In parallel with this, the food world has also been developing. Locals are already getting a taste for the exciting new brand of places on offer for coffee, wining and dining,  From the traditional to the new, here is the list of my favourites of those that have emerged thus far.

Café Lehár occupies a grand building ©Alan Gilman

Café Lehár occupies a grand building in one of the area’s grand old hotels ©Alan Gilman

Cafe Lehár

A very traditional cafe on the main street in the old Reduta hotel. We always head there for a mid morning coffee and either their šatka or their corn, klobasa and mayo salad in a cornet. The šatka is a triangular pasty-like parcel with a bacon and spicy tomato sauce filling.

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Pizzeria Hacienda

Pizzeria Hacienda is a pizza restaurant near the Lučenec railway station and quite simply the greatest in town, with a primrose yellow decor embellished by dark-wood beams and furniture (see the feature image). For me there will never be another pizza other than the bolognese pizza ! We know Sasi, the owner, and if pushed a little she’ll speak English.

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The delectable ©Alan Gilman

The delectable food at Čárda   ©Alan Gilman

Čárda

The forest is very close to the south-western side of the town centre, and hidden in the trees on the edge is probably the best known restaurant in Lučenec. Essentially a big log cabin in the woods, the Reštaurácia Čárda is cosy in winter and has an open veranda for outdoor eating. The menu draws from the Slovak and the Hungarian traditions with halušky (we all know about that one!), halaszle (the traditional Hungarian fish soup), babgulas (goulash soup) and my personal favourite ohen srdce (fire in the heart – spicy paprika pork in a potato pancake). Often our friend Norby, the owner, is around, and again he will speak English if needed.

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A true "cabin in the woods" ©Alan Gilman

A true “cabin in the woods” ©Alan Gilman

Art Furman

Vidina, a village just beyond the northern periphery of Lučenec, has the tiny Art Furman restaurant. The chef/owner is a Polish guy who offers an international menu. It’s probably more one for the special occasion as it’s a little more expensive than the average. Then again, the style (chandeliers, exposed beams and bare stone walls) is appealing and it’s worth forking out the extra cash for the ambience. My favourite dishes are the beef cheeks and the chocolate soufflé.

One of the prettiest and most inviting restaurants in the Central-South of Slovakia, Art Furman ©Alan Gilman

One of the prettiest and most inviting restaurants in the Central-South of Slovakia, Art Furman ©Alan Gilman

Tančiareň a pivovar Franz

A very new addition is this bar and brasserie with its very own craft brewery on site. It only opened in early this year. Housed in an old brick warehouse-type building, it has a real urban feel and buzz to it. They’ve built a stage which has live music, film nights and comedy. Things do change !

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Coming soon

On top of this, there’ll soon be a chance to go and really splash out on fine food at the renovated castle in Halič. Only about 5km out of town this sits very castle-like on the top of the hill and dominates the Lučenec area. We haven’t tried this yet as the full restaurant doesn’t open until September but the rumour is the chef at Art Furman is in charge.

Watch this space for more reports later in the year!

Getting to Lučenec

By road, the most probable route is from Zvolen via the new motorway eastwards toward Košice taking the E571 after Detva. It now takes about 45 minutes from Zvolen.

By train, again Zvolen is the main regional station with links to all other main stations in the country (namely Bratislava and Košice). Lučenec is on the main line between Zvolen and Košice. From Košice, travel time is 2 hours 35 minutes and there are four daily trains. However, direct buses also operate from Košice in-between times and the journey takes only 20 minutes or so longer.

Within Lučenec, buses can be helpful but the places noted here are generally walkable.

Your man in Lučenec

Alan is a Londoner married to Marika who is from Lučenec. Alan has been coming out to Lučenec for ten years on holidays but they are currently living there with their two small children and working in the family paper business, called Slovpap. If anyone needs more info on travel, hotels etc if they are passing that way he can be reached on email (gillmanar@gmail.com).

NEXT ON THE JOURNEY: From central Lučenec it’s 87km northwest to sample Banska Stiavnica’s wonderful eating scene.