Under the bridge... image y www.englishmaninslovakia.co.uk

Around Bratislava – Petržalka & the South: The Forgotten Banks of the Danube

I’d been shopping, as I remember (not at one of the big malls because I detest them) and fancied a stroll near the city centre. I found myself heading out across Most SNP under the baleful gaze of the UFO and then, where most people would turn left if they wanted a walk/cycle with some greenery along the Danube in the direction of Danubiana Art Gallery, I turned right, passed the few buildings the southern bank of the river has on this side (the outskirts of Petržalka neighbourhood), and then dipped into the river-hugging woods, which continue – in a surprisingly extensive wilderness – all the way into Austria.

First off, ensure you don’t take the path which heads to the left at the end of the paved footpath up a bank to join the main cycle route hereabouts – yours is the muddy little path twisting ahead through the middle of the trees. Initially this is an obvious track – with circles of ashes and charred stumps marking points where groups come to have opekačka (outdoor fires) in summer. The path appears to end at a WW2 bunker, only it doesn’t… it skitters up onto the top of the bunker and continues along a high bank now directly above the water.

RELATED POST: Try Canoeing down the Morava/Danube into Bratislava!

Up until the next bridge upriver 2km away, this is a route, it should be emphasised, to glorify in the little things. A commemorative plaque from the early 20th century etched in German, at a time when Bratislava was most firmly “Pressburg” and German was the default language spoken. Ancient and now abandoned mooring posts for vessels, which for a while I believed were there to demarcate the Slovakia-Austria border because of similar border markers I had seen in the Biele Karpaty on trails marking the boundary with the Czech Republic. Woodsy paths used by no one save the odd mushroom forager, because of the snazzier new international cycleway on the other side of the trees. Neglected miniature sandy beaches (you come to understand just how sandy some stretches of the Danube’s banks can be). It is also one of Bratislava’s cruising spots, and indeed I did pass a couple of male couples as the only other “walkers”, although received no proposition I hasten to add!

And, when you do glimpse civilisation in the form of the E65 main road (you have to head back across the river at this point; there’s no over river crossing now until after Hainburg 20km upriver, although this extension is a fabulous idea if you have a bike, and a picnic, and a couple of hours spare) the vast towers of advertising boards whose feet sit in a jungle of vines in the below-the-road countryside but whose face is destined to spectate on traffic forever.

All in all, it is a walk of the gentle and neglected riverside ilk, where the buzz of the city just a few hundred metres of water away contrasts with the completeness of the silence  – and the tangled root systems and grassy picnicking places.

One of Bratislava's infamous billboards - from below ©englishmaninslovakia.com

One of Bratislava’s infamous billboards – from below ©www.englishmaninslovakia.co.uk

Head across the afore-mentioned road bridge, Bratislava’s in-favour bungee-jumping spot (there is a pedestrian walkway) to where you meet the edge of Bratislava Botanical Garden (Botanicka záhrada) back under the city side of the bridge (we can’t bring ourselves to dedicate a separate post to the Botanical Garden but it is pleasant enough for a stroll if you find yourself here and is well worth doing at the end of this hike), as indeed is paying a visit to Bratislava Water Museum, aka the Vodárenské Muzeum, right nearby). To get to the nearest public transport from here, follow the road where the big under-bridge car park is up and to the right around the edge of some football pitches to reach the Lafranconi tram stop on the useful number 5 route (please see our Bratislava tram and trolleybus routes post for more).

MAP LINK:  

HIKE LENGTH: 4km one-way Bratislava Old Town-Lafranconi tram stop

WALK HIGHLIGHTS: Most SNP Bridge, the Danube, German plaque, Cycleway to Austria, Bungee-jumping, Bratislava Botanical Garden, Bratislava Water Museum

NEXT ON THE JOURNEY: 9km west along the riverbank from Lafranconi tram stop is Devin Castle – a phenomenal fortress and a starting point for our Štefánikova magistrála hiking trail across the whole of Western Slovakia.

MORE FORGOTTEN DANUBE AROUND BRATISLAVA: In the district of Podunajské Biskupice in south-eastern Bratislava south of Ružinov, it might at first seem that there is very little of note apart from the gargantuan oil refinery of Slovnaft. But if you turn right off road 63 as you head from Podunajské Biskupice to Dunajská Lužná (just after passing Slovnaft) at approximately this point on the map you wind up skirting the refinery that entering a world as pretty as Slovnaft is grim. This is mainly gorgeous woodland replete with snowdrops in early spring that contains a web of hiking (and, even better, cycling) trails along the edge of the Danube on what at this point is the north-eastern bank, on the opposite side of the river from the Danubiana Art Museum.

©Jonno Tranter

Hiking the Štefánikova Magistrála, Stage Two: Kamzik to Pezinska Baba

By Jonno Tranter.

©Jonno Tranter

©Jonno Tranter

From Kamzík, it’s easy to find the signs for the Cesta Hrdinov SNP Trail (Trail of the Heroes of the Slovak National Uprising), which encompasses (between Hrad Devín and Bradlo) the Štefánikova Magistrála. Look out for the white and red flag which you’ll grow to love – and hate – along the hike. The trail at first follows closely the cycle paths, but relatively quickly carves out a route of its own. A word of warning: the trail is not always well indicated. Very often you’ll arrive at a junction with no trail mark anywhere to be found. In this case you’ll just have to try both options, and perhaps backtrack. Having the Malé Karpaty region maps handy, however, will make your life a lot easier – see Hiking the Štefánikova Magistrála: Some Useful Tips for more information on the maps you’ll need, as well as for a host of other things it’s a good idea to know about walking this path before you start!

The heat in July is very intense, up to 30+ degrees, so make sure to wear light clothing if you’ll be hiking in the summer. A redeeming factor is that most of the time, you’re walking amongst very tall conifer trees which will block the majority of the sun’s rays. In the shade therefore, walking conditions can actually be very pleasant. For those uphill walks though, you’ll be sweating buckets, with little breeze to cool you off. Fortunately, there’s a few springs along the way after Kamzík, and the water is cool and clean. There are also a number of places for opekačka (the Slovak tradition of having open-air barbecues) with especially constructed wooden shelters and kindling provided.

©Jonno Tranter

The forests around Bratislava near the start of the trail ©Jonno Tranter

The trail from the forests immediately around Bratislava in which Kamzík stands (known as the Mestské Lesy) up into the Malé Karpaty is mostly forested; interspersed with the odd plain or clearing, but boasting few viewpoints, though this still makes for a very enjoyable walk. Your first stop along the Štefánikova Magistrála is Biely kríž, which comes after about three or four hours of walking through the woodlands. It’s a resting place where you’ll find a small shop selling drinks, energy bars and pastries. You’ll need the sustenance as from there it’s about four more hours to Pezinská Baba, where the trail opens up to some stunning scenery. Along this section, you’ll pass Tri Kamenne Kopce, from where you can intersect with a blue trail to walk down to the pretty wine-making village of Limbach (plenty of wine cellars offer tastings!). There’s a relatively steep downhill run before reaching the small settlement of Baba, so take care and make sure you’ve the got the proper shoes. You’ll know you’re close to civilisation when you see a few derelict mansions beginning to appear.

At Baba, high up on the road through the Malé Karpaty between Pezinok and Pernek, on the edge of the starkly contrasting and startling pancake-flat Záhorie region, the trail intersects a road, and you’ll find a couple places to eat and the quirky Motel Na Vrchu Baba, should you need a bed for the night. Baba, incidentally, is also the start point of the annual Baba-Kamzik run (although we were quite relieved to have conquered this distance by walking it!) We ate at the restaurant along the road, which serves very nice Slovak cuisine and some great desserts. Full and sleepy, we continued on the trail for a short while, set up the tent, lit a fire and watched as the sun set behind the mountains, and Mars, Saturn, and Jupiter appeared in the night sky.

The hills really do come alive when you do not have any other distractions, and at night you can hear the dear, rabbits, and other wildlife scurrying about. Though wild camping is not really encouraged in Slovakia, it’s very easy in this area as the trail is not policed at all, and you won’t encounter many other walkers. In fact, from Kamzík all the way to Bradlo, we only passed by a dozen or so other hikers, meaning you really get the area to yourself.

For us, the first full day of walking was over, but the trip had only just begun!

Jonno Tranter is a freelance graphic designer and illustrator who lives in Bristol, UK. In his spare time he likes to write, have adventures, and attend music festivals. This year, he decided to combine all three into an epic trip across Slovakia! Read more about him on his online portfolio (and on stages two to five of our series of features on the Štefánikova Magistrála trail – for Jonno, part of a gruelling adventure which saw him hiking from Bratislava all the way to Trenčin: discover it through the links below).

STAGE OVERVIEW MAP LINK:

WHAT NEXT?

Hiking the Štefánikova Magistrála – an introduction (featured in our Places to Go/Bratislava & Around and Places to Go/Western Slovakia sub-sections)

Hiking the Štefánikova Magistrála – Some Useful Tips (featured in our Places to Go/Bratislava & Around and Places to Go/Western Slovakia sub-sections)

Hiking the Štefánikova Magistrála, Stage One: Hrad Devín to Kamzík (featured in our Places to Go/Bratislava & Around sub-section) (Previous Stage)

Hiking the Štefánikova Magistrála, Stage Three: Pezinská Baba to Vápenná (featured in our Places to Go/Western Slovakia sub-section) (Next Stage)

Hiking the Štefánikova Magistrála, Stage Four: Vápenná to Dobra Voda (featured in our Places to Go/Western Slovakia sub-section)

Hiking the Štefánikova Magistrála, Stage Five: Dobra Voda to Bradlo (featured in our Places to Go/Western Slovakia sub-section)

Plus: More on the Cesta Hrdinov SNP Trail from Bradlo on towards Dukla…

Hiking the Cesta Hrdinov SNP, Stage One: Myjava to Vel’ka Javorina (featured in our Places to Go/Western Slovakia sub-section)

Hiking the Cesta Hrdinov SNP, Stage Two: Vel’ka Javorina to Drietoma (featured in our Places to Go/Western Slovakia sub-section)

image by www.englishmaninslovakia.co.uk

Around Piešt’any: the Mysterious Ruins of Tematín

Just a short distance north of Piešt’any, where the world and his wife come to take the waters, and a short distance south of Trenčin, another town of renown because of its medieval centre and annual music festival, Pohoda, there is a densely forested portion of the Malé Karpaty (Small Carpathians) which seems to have slipped off the radar of more or less anyone for the last few centuries. Of all the castles in this region of Western Slovakia (and there are several secreted up in the hills here) Tematín feels most remote.

A large-enough sign actually advertises the ruins as you’re approaching on the Rte 507 from Piešt’any: near the small village of Luka. And the castle is even visible, soaring surreally high above the tree-coated hills, from here. But we continued on through this village to start our hike up from the next village along, appropriately named Hrádok (approximate translation: castle town). Here again there is an information board but it’s far more hidden from the road and already by this point you are thinking that maybe that glimpse of Tematín was a hallucination – because the ruins themselves have disappeared from view and the signs are old, so ancient in fact it would be entirely plausible that since they were erected the final stones of Tematín had crumbled into dust.

And the feeling of uncertainty about whether Tematín does exist or not persists. You park your car at an old barn – having driven up the main entrance to Hrádok from Rte 507, passed the long street to the right where the football pitch is, continued over the bridge and headed uphill and around a sharp bend to the right passed two or three houses. Sound obscure? It’s about to get more so (although it’s also about to get more beautiful too). You’ll find yourself at a V junction of tracks. The right-hand (lower) of the two is the one you want. From here it’s a 1.5 to 2 hour hike up to Tematín.

Whilst there is a sign fairly early on detailing how it’s only 5km to the ruins, this is overly optimistic. As quick hikers it took us a good hour and a half – I would say from the parking to the ruins is probably between 8 and 9km. The track, a good forestry track, winds through gorgeous woodland that has hardly any other hikers passing through (perhaps because it’s off the official way marked trails). There is one point quite early on where there is a significant dividing of the ways at another V junction (this time be sure to keep left) but otherwise the route is quite obvious. The route traverses the grounds of a few holiday houses and climbs, joining a yellow trail but remaining on the same main forest track. A little later it doubles back on itself, climbing more steeply to rise up above the side of the forest valley you’ve been walking in and just after a narrower, steeper path cuts up to the right. Take this and you’ll climb to a path junction from which Tematín itself can be glimpsed.

Why you have followed this somewhat obscure, but very lovely path up here immediately becomes obvious. Tematín Castle is huge – and fairly in tact, actually. It was built in the late 13th century and played an important role in the anti-Habsburg insurrection of the early 18th century (the first major attempt to prevent Habsburg Austria from ruling over Hungary). The castles last owner was, indeed, Count Mikulaš Bercésnyi, the General of the insurgent army, and the siege of Tematín in 1710 marked the end of the insurrection and the end of the castle as an important stronghold.

tematin

The lower part where the main entrance is has a small wooden bunkhouse (pic above) where you can stay for free overnight if you have your own sleeping bag. There’s a fire pit here, too – and the isolated location (about a 1.5 hour hike from the nearest village) makes this some of Western Slovakia’s best wilderness accommodation. The reason for this serendipitous find is in fact the non-profit group than often come up here to do repairs and archaeology work on the castle (you’ll see the tools of their trade scattered around the site): they often stay over in the bunkhouse but at other times its all yours. In Slovakia, several old ruins are just being left to nature, so it’s nice to witness this castle benefitting from some TLC.

Ascend to the upper end where the tower is for the pièce de résistance: a stunning panoramic view of a huge section of the Malé Karpaty. And then? Well, get a fire going and indulge in a good old-fashioned sesssion of Slovak opekačka (roasting meat on an open-air fire, basically), crack open a cold (or perhaps by this stage luke-warm) beer and prepare for a night in the wilderness in one of Slovakia’s remotest castles. Otherwise, continue on the hike back down into Luka (1.5 hours) from where there are buses running about hourly back to Hrádok, where you parked your car.

A Quick Guide to the Other Content We Have on the Piešt’any Area:

Places to Go: Piešt’any’s Best Thermal Pools

Places to Go: Hiking in the Footsteps of Beethoven Around Piešt’any

Places to Eat & Drink: Piešt’any’s Best Cakes

Places to Eat & Drink: A Great Restaurant in the Hills Above Piešt’any

 

MAP LINK:

GETTING THERE: Hrádok and Luka are both accessible by bus from Nové Mesto and Váhom, notable only for being near Beckov Castle, and for having mainline train connections to Bratislava and Košice.

NEXT ON THE JOURNEY: From Tematín Castle it’s only 18km north to Beckov Castle

Around Bratislava – the North: The Mestské Lesy (Local City Forest)

IT IS BY NO MEANS the first time I have raved about, nor the last time I will write about, Bratislava’s Mestské Lesy: the wonderful forest that rises up above the city on its northern side. If people ask me what’s so great about living in Bratislava, this is one of the first things I say. A wild tract of hilly forest that begins right on the edge of the city (only a few km from the Old Town) and continues – well – pretty much all the way across Slovakia, actually.

The most popular part of the forest is around the Kamzik, or TV Mast, that sticks up like a sore thumb out of the greenery that frames Bratislava’s northern edge. But venture beyond this, or indeed approach the forest from another entrance, and you’ll have it much more to yourself. What’s exciting, in a nutshell, about the gorgeous deciduous and conifer woods here is that they continue, unfettered, beyond the limits of the city forest into the Malé Karpaty (Small Carpathians) which feed into the Carpathians themselves. Embark on a walk here and you know that nature stretches before you, should you be game, right the way into Romania, and with literally a handful of roads to cross during that time.

As blog followers know, I lived for three years+ in Rača, a large neighbourhood in Bratislava’s northeast, so my main entry point into the forest was always via Pekná Cesta. From the tram stop (on the No.3 or No.5 line out to Rača you walk straight up the “nice road” (as Pekná Cesta translates into English) passing two supermarkets and then following straight uphill out of the city. After 30 minutes’ walk or a few minutes’ drive you reach a car park with some barbecue grills, a small, invariably closed booth selling warm soft drinks, the nexus of several mapped-out running routes and, most importantly, the start of an intriguing forest-themed hiking adventure.

I was lucky enough to live on the fringes of this forest and go for runs in the lower echelons (and the vineyards below them) all the time but on my first serious hiking exploration – as it happened, on the 6th of January, Monday, Traja Králi or Three Kings’ Day as it is known in Slovakia – myself and my girlfriend were for several days prior in the frame of mind for a longer adventure… a much longer adventure. The day we chose was beautiful, with temperatures reaching 12 degrees C (when we started out I didn’t even need to wear a coat) and Bratislava folk were out for a spot of post-Christmas fresh air. It was an amazing advert for the city, with the smoke of venison wafting over from the barbecues, young families merrily embarking on the myriad trails and Bratislava’s large contingent of hardcore cyclists toiling up on the steep climbs out of the car park into the forest…

…In this part of the forest there are no refreshments (in fact there’s probably scope for some enterprising young individual to open a cafe/ restaurant like the abundance there are around Kamzik) but that’s hardly the point: you are getting straight out into a forest wilderness here where (seriously) there are wild pigs and bears abroad after night fall (either of which could easily kill people, meaning the wildlife here is nothing to be taken lightly. The Czechs (probably because they come more often to Slovakia than any other nation but also because they’re Czechs) have a reputation here for coming to Slovakia’s wildernesses, setting off into the blue yonder and getting into difficulties because they underestimate just how wild it is here.

It all adds an extra sense of adventure to any hike you do (provided you come prepared and aren’t out after dark). And isolated as it becomes in these forests, you are always accompanied by great signage, good noticeboards indicating where on the forest map you are and as already inferred, shelters/fire pits for typical Slovak opekačka (cooking meat on an outdoor fire in the woods, basically). It’s not for nothing hiking is one of Englishmaninslovakia’s top things about living in Slovakia.

This time out, we didn’t come prepared. Or rather, we didn’t realise how long the circuit we did would take. There we were, enjoying the sun slowly sinking over the treetops and then we were suddenly thinking: “ah, yes, when that goes down fully it will be dark – and isn’t that the hour when those wild pigs emerge?” I tried planning one of my legendary shortcuts back to the starting point. It would have been an amazing moment for a shortcut of mine to pay off. But it didn’t. We had to backtrack. By now it was getting seriously dusky. We couldn’t read our map (the green 1: 25000 Malé Karpaty Juh – available in all good bookstores; see our post on buying hiking apps & maps for more if you want a good map on either local hiking or hiking in Slovakia generally). The mythical stories of those wild pigs and bears seemed much closer.

Then a serendipitous short, portly bearded man (oh, such a classic Slovak, and with that absolutely essential hiking companion – a huge hip flask of the very, very strong stuff) tramped by and asked us if we were lost. It turned out we weren’t so off-the-beaten-path after all and he was able to direct us back to Pekna Cestá. Because despite all this tree-coated wilderness, we were only a few kilometres from the edge of Bratislava.

The man bid us farewell, and when he had guided us to the edge of recognisable territory, he turned off on some darker, far wilder looking path that was going in the opposite direction to civilisation.

“Where are you going now?” we cried, for it was almost pitch black by this point.

“Oh, I’ve got another 1 1/2 hours of walking yet” he replied. “I’m going to Marianka.”

Marianka, famous for being Slovakia’s main pilgrimage site, was a good 10km off. And indeed this man was a pilgrim. He was going to pray to the Panna Mária  (Virgin Mary); he did it every year on Traja Králi and, in the true style of pilgrims of old, by foot through these very forests. He took a long swig of strong-smelling alcohol. Whether that was a good idea if he was going to be contending with wild pigs and bears, I am sure he knew best.

NB: to the best of my knowledge, the forests around Bratislava contain no bears (there’s plenty in the High Tatras and Eastern Slovakia) but lots of wild pigs.

THREE TIPS FOR MESTSKÉ LESY HIKES!

On the blue trail from here to the edge of the city forest somewhere near Malinovsky Vrch (the point where it borders the Malé Karpaty proper) a number of exciting hikes are possible…

1: In fact, you could easily embark on what would be one of the classic Mestské Lesy hikes, on blue and red trails, from the Pekná Cesta car park: on all the way to Pajštún Castle (a total of 4.5 to 5 hours’  hiking) via Pánova Lúka and Drači Hrádok (thus encompassing three of our very favourite hiking destinations near Bratislava). Beyond Pajštún, should you so choose, you can continue hiking into the Malé Karpaty in Western Slovakia).

2: For something a little easier (and more or less what we did on the above mentioned day), follow blue to begin with from the car park and then, where the trail heads off on a more minor path, circle back (staying on the metalled lane) to a ruined sanatorium where a beautiful and rarely-used trail then climbs back up through woods, and eventually descends again to join the blue trail at a noticeboard/firepit on Pekná Cesta about a km uphill from the starting point. It’s an excellent round-trip foray into these woods, with loads of smaller tracks branching off to explore.

3: Our third featured possibility for hiking from Pekná Cesta is indeed our top recommended Bratislava Mestské Lesy hike, the Pilgrimage to Marianka.

OUR FAVOURITE RANDOM LITTLE PLACES TO GO IN THE MESTSKÉ LESY:

Pánova Lúka – An idyllic, verdant little meadow a 3-hour hike from Central Bratislava via Kamzik. A great place for Slovak opycačka (barbecue) or a game of frisbee! MAP (although you need a better hiking map to find the place). It’s off the red Štefanokova Magistrala trail (stage two) before Biely Križ…

The Yellow Trail from Pekna Cesta – A beautiful stretch of woodland close to the city, and part of our Pilgrimage Trail to Marianka path.

Drači Hrádok – This is a very ruined castle (only a few stones left) but the ruins themselves are in a forgotten little pocket of woods below Pajštún Castle. MAP It’s at the end of the yellow trail down from Pajštún Castle, just east of Borinka (and still a steep climb uphill from there).

MAP LINK 

GETTING THERE: For the part of the Mestské Lesy we’re talking about here, hop on Trams No.3 or 5 in the city centre and head out to Pekná Cesta, a 20 minute tram ride three stops beyond Bratislava Vinohrady train station.

NEXT ON THE JOURNEY: Walk any further on the paths described and you’re well and truly in the Small Carpathians. 12km north of Pekná Cesta (and accessible via the Pekná Cesta road through the forest) just passed Marianka is, indeed, Pajštún Castle.