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Poprad: Café La Fée

On a summer’s afternoon on a tree-shaded pavement cafe, groups of businessmen and suave young urbanites sit and slurp cafe au lait. The sunlight dapples their faces and slants into the interior, rendering the premises light, spacious, modern, inviting. The dapper old waiter deftly manages the clientele and pauses (at a sufficient distance not to cause offense, of course) for a cigarette. On the wall opposite the counter, the names of great French writers – Verne to Baudelaire – are scrawled in italics. Paris? Not a bit of it. La Fée lies at the heart of the High Tatras Mountains hub of Poprad. But it could have been plucked from a Montparnasse side street, it’s so French.

The menu is French, from its Quiche Lorraine to its mineral water. The service is French: it’s elegant, it’s respectful, it’s knowledgeable. The wine served is French. The cafe is still very new (it only opened in late 2012) so in this respect it is perhaps a little less French, but the place has been done tastefully to avoid the unfortunate ‘furniture showroom’ look a lot of totally refurbished restaurants have. It is not French in its prices, either (its coffees are under 2 Euros, its cakes are under 3 Euros, even a quiche will set you back less than 4 Euros). But in every other respect, Frenchness exudes throughout.

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Image ©www.englishmaninslovakia.co.uk

When I kick back with a coffee in a cafe, I like to do so with the intent of lingering a long while. I linger for the atmosphere, I linger for courteous service and I linger because I like to be allowed to linger. On all three counts, La Fée scores highly. Outside the pavement-fronting terrace is most popular but inside the conservatory-style outer room catches the best of the day’s light and would be perfect for when the weather is less clement than it was on my visit there. Here and around the counter (decorated with those legendary writerly names) is where the loners coveting caffeine fixes and the families on a proper a few hours of “cafe downtime” frequent: there are some sofas to encourage them in this. Getting the oldest of the waiters (pictured above) to serve you would secure you the dream Poprad cafe experience but being attended to by any of the friendly waitresses is no bad thing: they’ll explain the cake menu, for example, which changes daily as each of the fabulous cakes here is fresh, and takes several minutes due to the sheer variety. When I stopped by the last time it was a tough tussle between the Crème brûlée and the lemon and raspberry cheesecakes. But service complete, you’ll be allowed to linger as long as you want – and people do. 

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Image ©www.englishmaninslovakia.co.uk

La Fée (translating from French as the fairy, and indeed perhaps bestowing a certain magic on Poprad’s prime shopping street) is an anomaly in a sense, of course. Despite defiantly stamping on Poprad an air of timeless sophistication, perhaps what it illustrates more than anything is how Poprad is no longer the sleeping giant relying on its proximity to some sublime mountain scenery to pull in the punters – how it is very much a destination in itself, and how the wining and dining to be done around town (framed by those photogenic peaks) is a big part of the appeal.

 

A Quick Guide to the Other Content We Have on Poprad

Places to Go: Poprad’s funky contemporary art gallery in an old power station

Places to Go: Poprad’s lavish Aqua Park

Places to Go: Nine reasons to linger in Poprad

Places to Go/Getting Around: Taking the Mountain Railway into the High Tatras from Poprad

Places to Stay: A cool travel-friendly B&B in Spišská Sobota, Poprad

Places to Eat & Drink: Poprad’s trendy burger joint

Places to Eat & Drink: Poprad’s dignified Café La Fée

Places to Eat & Drink: Poprad’s Coolest Wine Bar

Places to Eat & Drink: Poprad’s gourmet chocolatier

Going Out: Poprad & the Manchester United Connection

Arts & Culture: Dedicated traditional Czech & Slovak music radio station now based in Poprad

Getting Around: London to Poprad Flights

Getting Around: The Poprad to Ždiar to Zakopane (Poland) bus

Top Ten Medieval Towns in Slovakia

 

MAP LINK:

LOCATION: Right on Námestie Svätého Egidia (number 114) next to the new Forum shopping centre (ooh, it’s all so glitzy and new).

FACEBOOK:

OPENING: 10am-10pm daily

BEST TIME TO VISIT: Come in the sun, any time, when you’ve got a spot of time to linger: after a long mountain leg-stretch, perhaps

NEXT ON THE JOURNEY: From La Fée it’s 2.3km northwest to Restart, one of the best new places for evening eating and drinking in Poprad

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Poprad: Restart

I returned to Poprad for the first time in almost a year the other day, but this article is nothing about turning over a new leaf, wiping the slate clean or any sort of spiritual journey: it’s about burgers. More specifically, it’s about the hottest new burger joint in town. Restart is emblematic of a new breed of eateries in the capital of the High Tatras – establishments that catapult the place dangerously close to being a culinary beacon in the east of Slovakia. And Poprad on a sunny late spring day did indeed seem pleasant (simmering if not over-boiling with animated cafes and packed restaurants). Of which Restart was one.

Whilst as a post title Restart conjures a certain mystique the name puts one off. Me at least. I’m not a fan of the trend in Slovakia to give English names to restaurants and bars just because it’s cool. Slovak is a language with few enough to champion its cause: nothing wrong with a Slovak name (Ludevít Štúr would be turning in his grave). But even the codifier of the Slovak language would be impressed by what goes on behind the pink-beige 19th century facade of this gourmet burger stop in the attractive Vel’ka district.

The idea? A Slovak interpretation of posh American fast food. And name aside, the feel is very modern-Slovak. There is a nod to the cosy “obývačka” or living room vibe – you know, battered armchairs, old standard lamps, framed paintings, antique furniture. But the staff? Modern Slovak. Young, true, but really caring about the menu and the dining experience. Some even speak English. The other diners? Modern Slovak. Youthful again, contributing to a bubbly but sophisticated ambience. One of the most striking things about Restart, indeed, is how full it always is. If you want to hang here with the bright young things of Poprad over your burger and fries, you’ll need to book, particularly in the evenings.

And the food? Just really very high quality burgers (all between 4 and 6 Euros). High quality, and high on the plate. Veritably teetering towers of bread-capped meat. Each of the signature burgers is dosed full of a homemade sauce which themes the filling. The Swiss, which uses a mushroom salsa to complement the smoked ham and Swiss cheese. The Teriyaki, which hooked me, and used a Restart version of the Japanese soy sauce dressing to sit with the gouda, crisped bacon and avocado (it works). There’s a Tennessee triple cheese burger with a Jack Daniels-based sauce that I’ve already eyed up for the next visit. I would have liked to see a better range of beers (although the standard Zlaty Bažant was available) – with maybe a few of the Slovak start-up breweries featured – perhaps one area to work on. Anyway. You’re not coming here to experience traditional Slovak cuisine, you’re coming here to see how a city like Poprad is evolving and exuding a quiet self-confidence, and how young entrepreneurs have turned the once-staid Slovak eating scene on its head.

Maybe Štúr would quit rolling over in his grave and just go order a Teriyaki burger with a side of fat hand-cut fries. Typically Slovak, that. Curious for the new, yet finding the tried-and-tested comforting.

A Quick Guide to the Other Content We Have on Poprad

Places to Go: Poprad’s funky contemporary art gallery in an old power station

Places to Go: Poprad’s lavish Aqua Park

Places to Go: Nine reasons to linger in Poprad

Places to Go/Getting Around: Taking the Mountain Railway into the High Tatras from Poprad

Places to Stay: A cool travel-friendly B&B in Spišská Sobota, Poprad

Places to Stay: A sophisticated 4-star resort right by Poprad’s Aqua Park

Places to Eat & Drink: Poprad’s dignified Café La Fée

Places to Eat & Drink: Poprad’s Coolest Wine Bar

Places to Eat & Drink: Poprad’s Gourmet Chocolatier

Going Out: Poprad & the Manchester United Connection

Arts & Culture: Dedicated traditional Czech & Slovak music radio station now based in Poprad

Getting Around: London to Poprad Flights

Getting Around: The Poprad to Ždiar to Zakopane (Poland) bus

Top Ten Medieval Towns in Slovakia

 

MAP LINK

LOCATION: in Poprad’s Vel’ka district north of Poprad Tatry railway station. In the evenings, especially at weekends, it’s good to reserve: call (00421) 918 305 001

OPENING: 12 midday-10pm Sunday to Thursday, 12 midday-12 midnight Friday/Saturday

BEST TIME TO VISIT: Check it out on a Friday or Saturday evening, booking a table for perhaps 8-ish, to see the place buzzing.

NEXT ON THE JOURNEY: Heading 2.4km southeast you reach Poprad’s AquaCity, one of Eastern Europe’s coolest (and yet hottest, as it is geothermally heated) waterparks

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Poprad: Nine Reasons to Linger

Poprad is the gateway to the High Tatras. Whether you’re coming here by road or rail you’ll have to pass through this sizeable city to those tempting and frankly quite bizarre looking mountains just beyond. And of course the question is: why stop? Why indeed, when there’s the beginnings of a mountain wilderness with scintillating hiking, and climbing – and some pretty exceptional skiing just a half hour’s drive or mountain rail ride away? The question seems more poignant yet when you see Poprad’s centre which, somewhat marred by tasteless ’60’s and ’70’s development, is no Levoča – not, in other words, with a great deal of old-fashioned charm (although in fairness it has been spruced up no end of late and now sports leafy boulevards, revamped museums and a burgeoning pavement cafe culture). But after a concentrated couple of days in Poprad recently, Englishmaninslovakia has come up with a list of Poprad’s plus points – and the list is longer than many might think.

1: Get the Info

Before you rush off into the mountains, it’s worth pausing to find out exactly what you can (and, sometimes, can’t) do there – and Poprad is the fount of all Tatras outdoor activities knowledge. There are several key bases you might want to head to – Ždiar for culture, Tatranská Lomnica for the highest mountains, Starý Smokovec area for some of the main chairlifts up into the mountains proper (and the most abundant accommodation) or Štrbské Pleso for the biggest ski resort, great hiking and that cherry on the cake of Tatras Hotels, Grand Hotel Kempinski. Do you, for example, want to go husky sledding? Would you like to stay in fancy accommodation or huddle in a mountain house? Do you like hanging from a chain off a precipice or not?

The answers to all these and more will influence where you want to end up, and Poprad’s perfect for providing answers. You can check out the pleasant little tourist information office or scout out the veritable mine of Tatras information that is Adventoura tours (actually Poprad’s coolest tour agency and offering loads of different activities).

Yeah – so get all the info you need, which will take an hour or two, and then go off and do something like – well – one of the things right below!

2: Spišská Sobota

Spišská Sobota is one of the best-preserved clutches of medieval architecture anywhere in Slovakia. It doesn’t grab the headlines like nearby Levoča does but it’s almost as splendid. The Gothic Kostol Svätého Juraja (Church of St George) at the western end of the long tapered oval of the námestie dates from the 13th century originally and – get this – the enigmatic but highly regarded Master Pavol was responsible for the altar here. Just across the way is the church architect’s old workshop.

Culinary Cool

But quality is kept high in the modern day too in Spišská Sobota. Arguably Poprad’s best restaurants flank the square here (such as Vino & Tapas, where the owner cooked for the Queen when she visited Poprad, on the northern side – or Fortuna on the southern side). Then there’s the atmospheric accommodation options in and around the square (again, in our opinion, Poprad’s best (Penzión SabatoPenzión Fortuna or, a block off the square, Penzión Plesnivec).

Oh, and how do you find Spišská Sobota? You take the main road Štefánikova and follow it (or the river running alongside it) east from the centre for about 1.5km, past Aqua City, then turning left at the sign for Penzión Plesnivec. Or follow the river along passing Aqua City until you hit the bridge by Hotel Sobota, turn left then take the first right up the hill to where you can already see the Spišská Sobota church tower.

3: Aqua City

Poprad’s Aqua City is the perfect way to counteract and sooth any aches and pains from a strenuous few days’ worth of hiking. Nigh-on 20 indoor and outdoor geothermal pools, all with temperatures in the mid- to high thirties (and that’s after being reduced from a natural 49 degrees): Aqua City might look starkly modern but its comforts are guaranteed – it’s one of Eastern Europe’s most well-appointed spa/wellness centres. There’s a hotel and wellness centre, of course, with cryotherapy and Thai massage centres & the like…

The High Tatras in their morning glory from Kvetnica

The High Tatras in their morning glory from Kvetnica

4: Kvetnica

Ten minutes’ drive outside Poprad is a forest park which gives you better views of the High Tatras than you get in the High Tatras (if you want an overview of the whole range, that is). There’s a farm here which may be your best chance to see the timid mouflon (large-horned mountain sheep) that have a large enclosure of several acres here. In Kvetnica there’s also a network of hiking and mountain biking trails and a chateau. Kvetnica is also much more verdant than a lot of the Tatras are – it makes for a gentle and enjoyable afternoon’s walk. Ask at the Poprad Tourist Information how to find it – it can be quite tricky.

5: Podtatranské Muzeum 

This museum has a fascinating new exhibition on the ancient treasures of a 4th-century Germanic prince dug up recently during construction of an industrial park, as well as permanent exhibits on Poprad since, er, Neolithic times. It’s recently moved to a new location in Spišská Sobota

6: The Tatranská Galeria (Tatras Art Gallery)

This art gallery is well worth a visit – you don’t expect to encounter culture in a mountain resort supply town but here it most definitely is. We’ve recently written this new post about the venue at  Hviezdoslavová 12 known as the Elektráreň (Power Plant). It hosts some pretty damned good exhibitions!

7: Cool Cafes (and Caffes) from Belltowers to Bistros!

In one of several buildings that still retains its old-fashioned grace (the bell tower right behind the church in central Poprad), the mean espresso mini-chain Caffe Trieste has opened its doors. I mean “mean” in terms of the cafe’s ability to produce a mean espresso, of course; not that its staff are mean (they’re not!). There’s also a wine bar here (upstairs up the spiral staircase) – making this the city centre’s most atmospheric drinking spot by a country mile.

See our article on Poprad’s suavest new cafe

 8: Bon Bon Chocolates

Oh, what is that beautiful correlation between mountain town resorts and chocolatiers? I don’t know, but I’m very happy with it. This is one of the best chocolatiers in Slovakia, and it’s right by the train station. I’d argue it’s even worth missing your train for. Small (and quite inviting) area for actually sitting and sipping – but you can always take that hot chocolate “to go” (yeah, in Slovakia now they actually often use the English “to go” for takeaway food which is rather comical when you listen to an ancient Slovak babka (grandmother) that cannot speak another word of English uttering it). Anyway, Bon Bon is on Dominika Tartarku – heading north from Štefánikova towards Poprad Tatry train station.

Our post on Bon Bon

9: Pizzeria Utopia – and the rest of the City’s Cool New Eateries

In an old schoolhouse out in the paneláky, Poprad’s coolest and liveliest pizzeria has been going ten years and is still every bit as popular as ever. Inside, it looks cosy too, with three dining areas and a great array of tasty pizzas. I’ve actually never seen a pizzeria even in Bratislava look as inviting as this one. It’s just south of the hospital on the other side of Rte 18 from the centre – and perfectly walkable from there. Pizzeria Utopia might be one of the first of this new breed of cool Poprad restaurants but it’s the tip of the iceberg as far as local dining goes.

Our post on Poprad’s new gourmet burger joint.

The final thing to remember is that Poprad is a far more pleasant mountain supply town than Zakopane on the Polish side of the Tatras and is certainly no worse than, say, Aviemore in Scotland or in fact many of those terrible big, soulless French ski resort towns. It’s not as beautiful as what lies just beyond, true. But it does have plenty of hidden charms… and yes, a little soul.

MAP LINK: (Kvetnica is indicated by the pinpoint at the bottom of the map)

GETTING THERE: Trains run every 1.5 to 2 hours from Bratislava’s Hlavná Stanica station to Poprad, take 3.5 to four hours and cost 11 Euros for regional trains or 19 Euros for the flashy IC trains (which have wifi).

NEXT ON THE JOURNEY: From Poprad, the obvious choice is heading 32km north to Ždiar to hike some of the lovely Tatranská Magistrála, or – for those that don’t like hiking – it’s 72km south to Rožňava, nearby which are some of Slovakia’s best caves

RELATED POST: London to Poprad Flights Alive and Kicking (could that in fact be reason 10 to get out to and hang out in Poprad?)

RELATED POST: How to get between Poprad, Zdiar and Zakopane in Poland by public transport (could this be reason number 11?)