dancers

The dance of friendship…

A real taste of Indonesia came to Slovakia when dancers performed in Bratislava as part of the Kulturne A Informacne Stredisko 2017.

Indonisian dances have specific meanings, sacred ritual dances in temples like the sanghyang dedari and Barong dances involving a trance-like state – and story dances like the, legong and kecak …

Indonesian Ambassador to Slovakia, Adiyatwidi Adiwoso, thanked Slovaks for their interest in the art and culture of his country and said his homeland is open to opportunities in the small but determined Central European country which is rapidly becoming a “friend of Indonesia”.

The festival was held at one of Slovakia’s largest shopping centers Eurovea Mall, famous for its cultural events, lounge bars and magnificent views of the Danube.

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Made in Slovakia – some of the world’s Porsche-st cars!

Slovakia is really on the road to success as some of the world’s greatest cars begin to be made there.

Porsche has revealed a new generation of SUV which is to be “Made in Slovakia” for the first time. Up until the annoucement the Cayenne’s bodywork and driving gear has been built in Slovakia before being sent to the Porsche plant in Leipzig for putting together.

The pledge to move production in 2014 to Bratislava and a year later a  foundation stone of the new factory in the Devínska Nová Ves area was laid .

And next year the Audi Q8 followed by Lamborghini’s first SUV will be made in Bratislava too.

The new Cayenne model is longer and lower but about 65 kilograms lighter. Volkswagen  claims the new SUV will excel off-road. It is also said that it will be able to accelerate to 100 km in less than five seconds. Both engines are combined with an eight-speed automatic transmission and all four-wheel drive.  

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How Slovakia launched itself into a cosmic club without boundaries

Somewhere, out there in the firmament a small cube of technological excellence is finally showing the world that Slovakia has joined the slow but determined battle to conquer space.

At 5.59 CET on June 23, 2017,  radio ham Dmitry Paškov, who lives in the Russian city of Ružajevka, started to receive data packets from skCUBE, which had been launched in conjunction with the Indian Space Research Organisation.

The main scientific experiment is its VLF receiver and a camera used to photograph Earth.  Part of the aim is to scan Slovakia from outer space.

Originally, the satellite was to be launched by the US firm Space X in May 2016, but it was postponed several times.

Space research has become part of the modern history of Slovakia going back to Soviet space programmes – but in 2015 this small country at the heart of Europe signed the European Cooperating State Agreement with ESA prompting Education Minister Juraj Draxler to say: “We have become a member of an exclusive club.”

In becoming an ESA member Slovakia gained knowledge of  important strategic information over cosmic activities and satellite development.”

Education Ministry spokeswoman Beáta Dupaľová Ksenzsighová said at the time: “ESA coordinates a joint space programme in its whole extent – from construction of space ships, via training of astronauts up to construction of satellites.”

Lucia Labajova, marketing manager of the Slovak Organisation for Space Activities, has said: “We see the development of skCUBE as a first spark of light in showing the world that Slovakia belongs to countries with a potential in space science and industry. We want to show that Slovakia has excellent universities, science institutions, and companies which innovate and make our country a good name around the world and going to prove it through our first satellite Made in Slovakia.”

Slovakia has been actively involved in space research and has two cosmonauts, Vladimír Remek, who flew in space in 1978, and Ivan Bella, who spent nine days on board the Mir space station in 1999.

The  Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics of the Comenius University in Bratislava has studied processes caused by cosmic radiation in meteorites and the Institute of Experimental Physics at SAV has designed and constructed space hardware for dozens of scientific probes and has conducted space weather research. 

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Why these bikers are real ‘Angels’ of Slovakia

When health company boss Miroslav Hruška realised just how much of his ‘old’ stock he was having to throw away, it gave him an idea which turned out to be really ‘good for Slovakia’.

Miroslav, aged 33, who lives in Presov, East Slovakia, got on his motorcycle and set off delivering the products that would normally be dumped to deserving causes across the region.

Very quickly he enlisted the help of his biker mates and volunteers and set up the World Charity Road team to collect and deliver everything from food and clothing to people in need across Slovakia.

Miroslav, who runs Dobré zo Slovenska (Good for Slovakia), said: “Basically, we were looking for a deeper meaning to riding motorcycles than just the  freedom of the road.  World charity road responds to a need to help  people families and organisastions that really need support. They might need food, clothing and toys, things that people should have a right to.”

Now, every Sunday about 50 bikers set off through the dramatic landscape of Slovakia delivering a bit of happiness to the needy.

Eric Wiltsher, programme director at the independent international radio station RTI.fm, has shared his exclusive interview with Miroslav with the consumerwatchfoundation.com.

during the Premier League match between XXX and XXX at Old Trafford on May 21, 2017 in Manchester, England.

How AquaCity moves mountains for Manchester United hopefuls

Heroes of British soccer have revealed one of the best-kept secrets of Slovakia  … for the last eight years Manchester United has been sending its young hopefuls there to a specialist mountainside training camp.

Every October Manchester United’s Youth Team spends time in the city of Poprad training at one of the world’s most exciting stadiums, playing ‘friendlies’ against locals and recuperating in the world’s greenest hotel.

Poprad is an extraordinary place, tacked to the foot of the High Tatras mountains and near to the Polish border.

Thirty years ago though it had daunting metaphorical mountains to climb having been abandoned to the remnants of the Velvet Revolution politics.

But people of vision were already making things happen and now Poprad is one of the most important cities in Slovakia. It has become the administrative, economic, cultural and tourism centre for the whole Tatras region.

And at its heart stands AquaCity, once voted the world’s greenest hotel … and this is where Manchester United hopefuls stay while they undergo training regimes against one of the most powerful natural backdrops in Europe.

Former Manchester United assistant manager Ryan Giggs said this: “It is vital in a young players development that they get to gain as many different types of football experience as possible. Because of the training in Poprad they can relate to playing against different opposition, experience new cultures and food, travelling and adapting to new surroundings. The training camp in Poprad allows all this to happen.”

And last week it all paid off in a big way – youth team  players who trained in Poprad were chosen to play against Crystal Palace  when Jose Mourinho   rotated his squad ahead of the Europa League final.. Manchester United won the game 2-0, with Josh Harrop and Paul Pogba scoring the goals.

The story really begins with former car worker  Dr Jan Telensky, his geo-thermal lake 2,000 metres inside the earth – and his belief in cryogenics.  Three little minutes   that can change your life.

He said:  “When I first came to Poprad, I saw a pipe coming up out of the ground. It had breath hot enough to melt your soul. So, I looked into the history of it and pretty soon I realised there was a natural miracle two miles below the earth. An eternal source of power, warmth and health. It’s been there for millions of years and it’ll be there for millions more.

“I decided to harness it, that’s all. The government and the town of Poprad worked with me on it.”

Next door to AquaCity  is a magnificent new football stadium, designated as a Slovak National Training Centre (NTC). It is the only ground in the world to be heated by an underground lake and have an all-weather pitch.

The NTC is where you can watch the Manchester United football’s stars of tomorrow train and play some of Slovakia’s Premier League and other overseas teams for a fraction of the price it would cost at Old Trafford.   There is a Hall of Fame board inside AquaCity with a list of the stars who have played there.

 David Moyes, a former manager at MU who was involved in the training experiment: “This the ideal place for a sports training camp, the fourteen swimming pools and the leisure facililities are enormously popular with our young players.”

And AquaCity  offers all sorts of fitness and enjoyment, not only for professional sportsmen but for families too with pools, massage jets, children’s pools  and water slides,  laser lights to change the color of the water, outdoor thermal pools, blue Sapphire pools, blue diamond pools, and a 50 metre swimming pool.

In the wellness and spa suites there is Vital World, the K-Vital Beauty Centre, the Massage Centre, and the Thai Massage Centre with edible massage treatments such as chocolate, honey and green apples.

Then there is the controversial cryogenics chamber which has been helping sports people and visitors with injuries and ailments.

It is the Big Chill, an oversized deep-freeze which makes you feel wonderful. It works  wonders for the skin and muscles, can boost your immune response, ease chronic pain, heal nerve damage, and improve sporting performance.

And Poprad too  really is a beautiful place to be, sitting as it does on a vast plain leading to the foothills of the perpetually snow-capped Tatras Mountains.

It came into being in the 13th century, when the king of Hungary persuaded German colonists to move to what was nothing more than isolated arable land. Way back then Poprad was just one of more than 20 farming communities dotted across the plains.  It soon garnered importance however, as a main stopping-off point on the trade route between Poland and Hungary.

Another ‘revolution’ took place in 1938 when a military airfield with grass for a runway was built  west of Velko village as World War II loomed. The first real runway wasn’t actually built until 1970.

Poprad Tatry Airport finally came into its own in the early 21st century when it was classed as of International standards.

The 13th century Early Gothic church of St. Egidius in the town square still retains pieces of  wall paintings  dating from the Middle Ages. And then of course there is the Renaissance bell tower built in 1592 with its three original bells. 

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Back to the future in enigmatic Slovakia

Going on holiday in Slovakia really is like going back to the future.

On the one hand time stands still, sometimes deliberately and sometimes because there  simply has been no reason to change it.  On the other  Slovakia  has the proud Tatra Tiger, the nickname of its burgeoning economy. And of course it also has its incredibly successful hi-tech motor and aviation industries.

But there is no doubt that Slovakia remains the beating heart of European history with its ancient cities and towns, its boiling underground lakes and its snow-capped mountains where great bears and wolves still roam like antediluvian shivering armies

It is a small enigmatic country, bordered by Poland, Ukraine and Hungary, and is so ancient that you can taste history in the air … the smell of  Kapustnica soup cooking on a stove in a witch’s hat of a hillside  Koliba or the sulphur of the great Poprad River flowing from the Carpathians.

         And then of course there is the world’s greenest  and technologically astounding hotel, AquaCity,  Poprad, Central Slovakia, a town which now in so many ways brags the best in the ancient and modern.  The hotel was built by reknowned British and Central Europe visionary Dr Jan Telensky.

History has made Slovakia what it is today …  look at the stone tools dating back to the Ice Age and the Venus of Moravany, a female figure  carved out of  mammoth tusk  dating to 22,800 BC. The ivory figure was dug up by a farmer in 1930 in  Podkovica,  less than two hours from Poprad.

Sometimes in Eastern Slovakia you will come across the remains of hill forts standing against the skyline. Some date back to the First Century and are stark monuments to the Celtic invasion at the first documented turn of the pages of history.  Name some eastern forts

Yes, the history of the glorious little country just goes on and on. It is rife with tales of invasion and revolution. The Romans, the Huns, the Mongols, the Bohemians, Hungary, Poland and Germany have all wanted to steal a piece of it.

And then of course  in November 1989 there was  the Velvet Revolution which led to the downfall of Communism in Czechoslovakia and finally showed the way to the independence Slovakia had battled so hard to win.

The final revolution of course was in 2004 when it   joined the EU and was placed firmly on the international tourism map.

So, here we are in the first quarter of the 21st Century with politics and the economy, hopes and aspirations taking on an  entirely different complexion.

Eastern Slovakia is a wonderful and evocative place to be, with its hills and mountains  and,   its lowlands with its sublime vineyards. Tokaj is probably the most famous wine fermented there.

Poprad is likely to be your first experience of the mountainous country of the East, it is the closest city to the High Tatras Mountains and boasts the region’s major transport links, trains, buses and planes.  There is Poprad airport which was renovated and updated a few years ago and a there is a plethora of taxis waiting there to take you to the ancient city centre or indeed AquaCity, quite simply the place to stay and be seen.

Poprad is alive with quaint and charming bars and restaurants and is the gateway to the Tatra Mountains. But it has its own ‘hidden gem’, Spišská Sobota, a village less than ten minutes walk away which is a conservation site boasting Baroque burghers houses, merchants and artisans houses and a beautiful market square with a 15th century church and Renaissance bell-tower.

The real draw in the region though has to be AquaCity with its saunas, Olympic swimming pool, outdoor pools, centres of well-being, laser light shows, bars, restaurant, cafes, sumptuous rooms and its cryochamber. Amazingly the  hotel is powered by a  geothermal lake and the sun itself.

It’s the place to be to take part in all the things the mountains – described as the teeth of Slovakia – offer from dog sledding, skating on the mirrored lakes, snowboarding, horse riding, climbing and even golf.

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Poprad, a postcard across time is voted winter’s real wonderland

The beautiful city of Poprad had daunting metaphorical mountains to climb less than 30 years ago.

Foders Travel Guide to Eastern Europe said in 1993 that Poprad was a place you ‘don’t want to linger’.

And certainly when I first set down there more than a decade later it was a place that appeared to have been in a state of suspended animation for decades. The political dark ages of Communism were still throwing a zombied shadow across its streets.

Old tenement buildings and 1950s new-age housing projects were decaying symbiotically and  community gardens and parks were choked with weeds and litter.

But people of vision were already making things happen and a decade further on Poprad is one of the most important cities in eastern Slovakia. It has become the administrative, economic, cultural and tourism centre for the whole Tatras region.

Poprad really is a beautiful place to be, sitting as it does on a vast plain leading to the foothills of the perpetually snow-capped Tatras Mountains.

It came into being in the 13th century, when the king of Hungary persuaded German colonists to move to what was nothing more than isolated arable land. Way back then Poprad was just one of more than 20 farming communities dotted across the plains.  It soon garnered importance however, as a main stopping-off point on the trade route between Poland and Hungary.

The next major spurt of growth came almost six centuries later when the Industrial Revolution brought the rail-road clattering across the mountains.

Another ‘revolution’ took place in 1938 when a military airfield with grass for a runway was built  west of Velko village as World War II loomed. The first real runway wasn’t actually built until 1970. 

Poprad Tatry Airport finally came into its own in the early 21st century when it was classed as of  International standards.

Despite Foder’s proclamation Poprad is definitely a place to linger with its historical buildings  reflecting German and Polish influences.

The 13th century Early Gothic church of St. Egidius in the town square still retains pieces of  wall paintings  dating from the Middle Ages. And then of course there is the Renaissance bell tower built in 1592 with its three original bells.

If history fascinates you then it’s worth visiting  the  Podtatranské Muzeum where there is a permanent exhibition of artefacts found in the Poprad over the centuries, some of which came to light recently when a work began on a new industrial park. And of course there is the Tatranská Galeria – the Tatras art gallery. More avant gard art can be found at the Power Plant building on  Hviezdoslavová 12.

Also ‘linger’ in the main square with its pastel facades of buildings which excellent cafes, rstaurants and bars … you have to taste the hearty peasant cooking that dominates Slovak cuisine. The traditional dish of bryndzové halus, gnocchi-style dumplings with tangy sheep’s cheese and bacon cubes, is best appreciated after a long hike in the mountains.

Take time too to visit the wooden huts which are actually market stalls selling everything from local honey and shots of Demänovka, a herbal liqueur.

In so many ways Poprad is the perfect place to ‘linger’. 

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A country where folk is the lore of culture

Slovakia has fought long and hard to keep its traditions and customs alive and today folk song and dance are  treated as family heirlooms, passed down from generation to generation.  

Historically all districts and regions had their own  music, dialects, customs and costumes.  Today these are kept alive, not only within families, but are also taught at local schools.

Slovaks sing about love and happiness at the drop of a traditionally knitted hat but they also sing with pride about the beauty of their homeland.

Folk festivals abound. The annual folk festival  at the foot of  the Poľana Mountains,  a small  range in central Slovakia  has been held  in the second week of July in the amphitheatre in the town of Detva for more than 50 years. Very often there can be 1500 performers taking part.

The open air Museum of the Slovak Village  is definitely worth a visit too. It is  a celebration of the harvest home and the ancient ways of collecting the  harvested.

It stands  on the outskirts of the northern city of Martin in the North of the country and came into being in the 1960s to commemorate Slovak buildings, farm methods and day-to-day living in the 19th  century. The  15 hectares  site consists of more than 100 buildings, farms, croft lofts, a pub, a village store, a garden house, a firehouse, a wooden Renaissance bell-house and an elementary school.

And then of course there is the  handicraft fair in Nitra,  at the foot of Zobor Mountain, in the   Nitra River  valley. Nitra is the oldest Slovak town.

Slovaks have a long tradition of handicrafts, woodcutters, ceramists, potters, tinkers, weavers, blacksmiths and makers of fujary,  a  musical instrument used by Slovak shepherds – a wooden  pipe as tall as a man.

There also makers of cat-o´-nine-tails, bobbin and point laces, embroideries and jewellery.

Almost every ruined castle in Slovakia has its legend. Sometimes these legends are blood-curdling. One such legend is the story of Csejte. In this tale, a ruthless countess murders three young girls and bathes in their blood, thinking it will renew her youthfulness.

Belief in witches, ghosts, and other supernatural beings persist in some areas. Morena, a goddess of death, is the object of a springtime custom. In it, young girls ritually “drown” a straw doll in waters that flow from the first thaw.

In rural areas, some Slovaks still believe that illnesses can be caused by witches or by the “evil eye.” They seek the services of traditional healers who use folk remedies and rituals.

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MUSIC AND LAUGHTER IN THE KOLIBAS

If you ever decide to take tea in a koliba as eccentric as the one in Stara Lesna, take a fire extinguisher too. They spike your tea with a lethal dose of Slivovica and serve it in flames.

It gives you a heartburn that can only be put out by a bottle of red wine while the resident gypsy trio plays bohemian rhapsodies in this tiny village off Route 534, two miles from Tatranska Lomnica.

A stately Kalinka, Kalinka, Kalinka Ki-ya on a double bass, violin and a percussive cimbal gets the diners dancing hand-in-hand round the stone rotisserie where tiny game birds hiss and spit.

The gypsies kylinka to a halt. The diners return to their tables and raise their glasses solemnly.

Then the waiters take over, singing as they serve brynza (chopped onion and crusty bread) before the main course of kapustova polievka – dumplings with sheeps‘ cheese and fried bacon.

Kolibas really are the places to eat – smoky and boisterous, charming, funny and cheap.

They are the historic memories of the sheep sheds dotted across the mountains. For centuries those sheds were beacons to snowbound hunters. Roofs like witch’s hats pulled down against the elements, hickory smell of smoke, heavy soups, incendiary brandy and a roaring fire.

Restaurants, cafés and burger bars are springing up all over the place as Slovakia tourism booms and, because of them, an important part of the past is fading into the background.

But the real kolibas are worth tracking down. You can recognise them by the folk music behind closed doors.

Climbers and skiers like the koliba in Tatranska Lomnica because of its good beer and proximity to the ski slopes of Skalnate Pleso. Music lovers like it there too, particularly in August – it’s only a short trip to Zakopane into Poland for the International Highland Music Festival.

The kolibas and folk music are the cultural heart of Slovakia‘s society. They are the taverns they still write songs about.

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White knuckles and white water

Leigh G Banks tells of his experience in Slovakia


 

I’ve just had the most fun it’s possible to have whilst drowning.

White water rafting is for crazy people … and, you know what, it should be compulsory for everybody to go crazy at least once in their lives.

And it was on a river under the Tatra mountain landmark of Krivan   that my mad adventure began.

After a brief briefing that basically consisted of hang on no matter what, we pushed off in to the cold cold water   in a dinghy that groaned and undulated more than the river itself.
As we sailed down the rapids backwards, sideways, and in some cases in the boat, out the boat, my attention was drawn to   an eagle that flew as silent as plane with a rabbit in its claws.

But it was that split second’s lack of concentration that nearly drowned me … the dinghy skimmed round a rock, leaped to the left and dumped me into the river to the right.

Well, as the river took me, all I   knew was that it didn’t matter any longer whether I could swim or not, I was rolling and tumbling beneath the waves, devoured by the current that miraculously slid me safely through the rocks.

And as the river turned me and began to choke me with my own hair, I remembered what the group’s captain said – lay your   head on the pillows of the water and refuse to struggle.

Thrashing

My body skimmed across a rock and I shot into a syphonic alley as if I was an eel. The shale turned into smoke as I shimmied through it.

I finally broke the surface like a maniac, thrashing my arms around and coughing and splashing and for that split second I was back amongst the living I couldn’t tell if the looks on the faces of my companions were of horror or hysterical laughter.

… But then I was gone again beneath the surface.

I   was jettisoned over a small waterfall and crashed feet-first in to the next natural lock   of white water. I grabbed a slice of breath before the surface closed over me as tightly as the whale closed over Jonah.

Now, there is a natural corkscrew in a fast-flowing river – and that corkscrew with the conspiring of the rocks can knock you inside out, crack your skull and disembowel you all at once. But I’d been taught well and allowed myself to glide as if I was riding the edge of the air.

And I survived. They found me perched on a rock … the dinghy shuddered and jerked as my colleagues helped me back in. And yep, they’d been laughing all along – while it had been a journey of discovery and trauma for me, to them it had been a big   joke that actually lasted less than 30 seconds.

But it was like a right of passage … I knew how Davy Crockett must have felt in all those 1950s B movies.

Whitewater rafting is a big thing in Slovakia now with bases across the country … but the best must be in the Tatras mountains or at least near them.

For instance, the Dunajec is a river running through southern Poland and forms a border between Poland and Slovakia for 27 kilometers in the Pieniny Środkowe (Slovak: Centrálne Pieniny) range, east of the Czorsztyn reservoir. It is the only river taking waters from the Slovak territory to the Baltic.

What’s different about rafting here is that you can take the ride on a wooden raft!

Rafting on River Orava offers smooth sailing and is ‘suitable for beginners and   children. Orava river is navigable throughout its course from Tvrdosin to its confluence with the river Vah in Kralovany.

Ondrej Cibak Area water slalom   is located 1.5 km far from the city of Liptovsky Mikulas in the North and is worth a visit.     The area is fed by water from the river Vah. The best conditions are in the spring months of May or June the course is open from early April to late October. It is suitable for everyone.

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Plum madness of Slivovica

One of my favourite libations is Slivovica (pronounced slee-woh-weetza). Absinthe may have a mythological, illegally glamorous reputation all over Europe – but Slivovica is rightfully seen as Slovakia’s plum madness.

The best is aged for years in oak barrels; it smells like molten gold and has a fire that incinerates your taste buds. The very best is distilled from Adriatic plums from the oldest trees along the coast.

Good brandies such as Amice or Karnataka come from Pelion, a town at the heart of Western Slovak’s wine region.

The worst is the un-aged variety sold in the darkest kalians and in back street supermarkets. It’s harsh but does its job.

So, let’s imbibe in a glass or two…

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Flights: Flying to Slovakia WITHOUT Ryanair

It’s about 1am in the draughty terminal at Luton Airport. They call it London Luton even though it’s over an hour away via a dirty train journey, of which the best thing that can be said of it is that it at least circumnavigates central Luton.

Luton Airport might, indeed, be purgatory (and seems to be constantly “under refurbishment”. Several hundred miserable individuals like me, huddled round plastic seats, eking out the dregs of their Costa coffee, here because their cheap flight leaves at 6am (which means check-in is 4am), piling on the layers of clothes so they can transfer mundane items from their carry-on luggage to get it down that 0.2 kilos below the 10kg limit, waiting grim-faced for the invariable announcements about delays or cancellations or, still more likely, the absence of announcements about delays and cancellations because the pimply-faced Ryanair customer service operatives cannot be bothered to make one. Several hundred individuals living, quite accurately, little better than animals for the next few hours until they reach their airport destination the other end – which, also, will be nowhere near the town or city it’s named after.

I really hope you have no idea what I’m talking about. But I fear you might. Yes, the wait for that Ryanair flight, the horror of which is almost enough to put you off making a journey in the first place. Almost, but not quite. Still we do it to ourselves. I do it to myself. Have been for the last few months, experiencing some of the many ways of travelling by plane between England and Bratislava.

I guess we do it because we always think it will be alright. We’ll get an early night (we reassure ourselves) so we don’t have to worry about that ridiculously early departure time, that the lack of leg room, or the at times brutally rude stewardesses who you wouldn’t trust with helping you across the road much less guiding you across half of Europe, won’t get us down, that the chirpy automated voice with the irksome Irish lilt informing us about scratch cards can be blocked out. So this is why me and the other miserable individuals are here, at this forsaken hour, in Luton Airport.

Bratislava, in fact, is connected by air to London Luton and Stansted, Birmingham and Liverpool. For a Slovakia-bound Englishman/woman there are plenty of flight options, and all with Ryanair. Slovakia, in fact, has over sixty per cent of its in/out commercial flights controlled by, yep, Ryanair.

I’m not going to get started about big corporations’ stranglehold on the Slovak economy, and how these corporations for almost undoubtedly dubious reasons are welcomed to take that stranglehold by senior Slovak ministers. Not in this post. But on a purely Ryanair-focused note, they are one of the multinationals that can be said to “own” Slovakia. They are, in effect, the national airline. There are multiple reasons why this is worrying. Again, this post isn’t the time to delve into many of them. But such dominance is certainly EXTREMELY worrying for Slovakia’s image as a tourist destination (and what with this blog and all Slovakian tourism is of concern to me)  that so many visitors have, as their first impression of Slovakia, that atrocious Ryanair experience which I am, as I write, undergoing for the umpteenth time. For most of us, there just isn’t any other feasible option.

The Alternatives to Ryanair

Wizz Air from Luton to Brno, followed by two-hour bus to Bratislava.

Well who wants to rock up at a destination only to find their destination is actually a further two hour bus ride away? Not me. Plus, flight times are limited (Fridays, Sundays and Mondays only). Prices can be as low as £40 but are more often over £100.

Easyjet from London Gatwick to Vienna, then one hour bus/train ride to Bratislava.

It’s still a more inconvenient option but it’s a viable alternative, mainly because, whilst Easyjet are very far from the ideal airline, they’re not Ryanair. And the cabin baggage allowance is those precious few centimetres more width-ways and length-ways. Flights are regular (once daily), but you’ll need to book ahead to get a good rate. Even a week prior to flying, flights are £100 plus, and often over £150. Where as Ryanair, those unscrupulous devils, do at least have what could be termed a “cheap” flight as little as a few days in advance.

(or scrap flying to Bratislava and see how to fly from the UK to the High Tatras or the UK to Slovakia’s second city, Kosice)

OK, my feet are cold and I have to pay £5 for wifi so can’t even post this post yet (and therefore not until Bratislava, meaning, readers, you’re reading this in real time minus about eleven hours, sorry for the lack of authenticity and corresponding feeling of gloom this causes). I can’t even rant to the world: talk about suppression. I’ll go get another Costa Coffee.

Tip

If you’re over-nighting at the airport for your flight to Bratislava, make it Stansted. More people sleep there (the seats in the far corner by zone J). There’s also more diversions for those of you too cold to sleep. And they have the whisky shop there that gives out generous free drams if you pretend you’re interested in buying some…

Which post to read now? Skip merrily on to my foolproof Mastering Public Transport in Bratislava post (assuming you arrive, despite this post, at the airport).